C# Hash String to Hexadecimal String

Outputs a 40 character hexadecimal hash string using the MD5 algorithm.

private string ToHash(string source)
{
    byte[] bytes;
    char[] c;
    byte b;
	
    //using (SHA1 m = new System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1Managed())
    using (MD5 m = System.Security.Cryptography.MD5.Create())
    {
        bytes = m.ComputeHash(System.Text.UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(source));
        c = new char[bytes.Length * 2];
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.Length; ++i)
        {
            b = ((byte)(bytes[i] >> 4));
            // replace 0x57 with 0x37 to output uppercase
            c[i * 2] = (char)(b > 9 ? b + 0x57 : b + 0x30);
            b = ((byte)(bytes[i] & 0xF));
            // replace 0x57 with 0x37 to output uppercase
            c[i * 2 + 1] = (char)(b > 9 ? b + 0x57 : b + 0x30);
        }
    }
    return new string(c);
}

C# Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan) to Run Every 10 minutes

Based on truncating a DateTime to the second in C# while preserving the “Kind” (Local, UTC, Undefined):

dateTime = dateTime.AddTicks( - (dateTime.Ticks % TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond));

Thread.Sleep until the next 10 minute mark (e.g. Run every 00, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 minutes):

Thread.Sleep(
    TimeSpan.FromTicks(
        (TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute * 10) - 
        (DateTime.Now.Ticks % (TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute * 10))
    )
);

Credit: http://stackoverflow.com/a/1005222/152852

In the real world, the above code appears to be waking up a fraction of a second too early. So perhaps adding an additional tick might be the way to go:

Thread.Sleep(
    TimeSpan.FromTicks(
        1 + (TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute * 10) - 
        (DateTime.Now.Ticks % (TimeSpan.TicksPerMinute * 10))
    )
);